According to the US Census Bureau, the 46 million eligible young voters (ages 18 to 29) in the United States make up 20 percent of the country’s total voting population. Despite the noteworthy ratio, the number of young voters who register and show up to the polls has decreased in the past several decades. Since the 2012 presidential election, however, the number of millennial voters has been on a gradual rise in both local and national elections. No matter how small the election, everyone’s votes impact the overall election results.

 

Jonathan Lauder

Social Studies Teacher

 

Why is it so important for young voters to have their voices heard?

 “Government impacts everything in our lives, and sometimes young people don’t understand that.”

 

What makes this specific election important?

“This is the first time that the race has been as competitive as it is, especially for our district. It’ll be interesting to see what happens.”

 

Why do you think that so many young people decide not to vote?

“Politics is hard to follow and it’s hard to see exactly how it impacts the things we do on a daily basis.”

Julia Richardson

Social Studies Teacher

 

Why is it so important for young voters to have their voices heard?

“They take the voice that they have for granted, and older people tend to make assumptions about the younger generations.”

 

What makes this specific election important?

“All elections are important. This election determines who has the majority in the House. We’re in a new world politically with new norms and ideals.”

 

Why do you think that so many young people decide not to vote?

“They’re apathetic and don’t understand how the outcome will affect their lives.”

 

   Why Every Vote Matters

In Aug. Ohio held a congressional election between Democrat Danny O’Connor and Republican Troy Balderson. Near the end of the race, Balderson was leading by less than one percent. Out of more than 203 thousand votes, Balderson ended up winning by less than two thousand.

 

In 2000, Democrat Al Gore and Republican George W. Bush were the presidential candidates. The race was close all over the country, but Bush won Florida’s popular vote by only 270 votes. Multiple recounts took effect, but Bush was ultimately declared the winner.

 

In 1974 in New Hampshire, Republican Louis Wyman beat Democrat John Durkin in several recounts. The final results were held for eight months until the Senate demanded a final revote. Ultimately, Durkin won by two votes.

 

From 1972 to 2016, the number of youth (ages 18 to 24) who reported voting in presidential elections dropped from 50 to 39 percent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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